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We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. In addition, text and image links to merchants in this post may be affiliate / referral links, which means we may be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking through those particular links. See our full disclosure policy here.


I recently went out for coffee with a dear family friend. She had shared how she felt that new moms often aren’t honest about parenting or what they’re going through… they act like parenting is easy and there are minimal challenges or issues.

I thought about this and I think she’s right. It seems many moms aren’t honest about parenting. They act like they have it all together and put on the facade of supermom.This ego of “supermom” can be truly disheartening especially to new or first-time moms. I think I’m pretty frank about my parenting challenges, especially here on my blog, but I thought I would take a few moments to share a few of my truths about parenting.

Before my husband and I had children, we talked about how fortunate we are to have education and experience in Early Learning and Child Care. Parenting would be easier for us. Teaching should come freely. Mentoring… a breeze. Then we became parents and just like anyone else we floundered.

The skills and knowledge we gained through our educations did not prepare us for the big feelings and the intense moments that are tremendously different and distinct when dealing with your own children, as opposed to dealing with other people’s children.

Would you add something to this list of absolute (and often unspoken) truths about #parenting? Click To Tweet

There will be days that you will want to toss in the towel.

We had a lot of those shortly after our girls were born. Your world is turned upside down and as cute as that little baby face is… you’re overwhelmed, exhausted and maybe a little frustrated (and that’s okay).

I once had a friend that posted on their Facebook wall, “Baby is home and we cut the hospital tags. I guess that means we have to keep him.” I had to laugh… because we’ve all had fleeting thoughts such as these.

Children will test your marriage.

Suddenly there are intense discussions around cloth or disposable… whose turn it is to get up with the baby… and how to deal with enormous temper tantrums. Moreover, if there aren’t intense discussions about these things, there may be intense discussions about WHY there aren’t intense discussions about these things. It’s okay to feel frustrated with one another… guaranteed at one time or another you will feel frustration with your partner. However, at the end of the day, try to remember that you’re a team and try to approach things that way!

Children will test you.

You are supposed to be the “expert” when it comes to your own child but trust me, there are moments when you will look at your child and say, “Who the heck ARE you and what did you do with MY kid?”

Parenting is lonely.

After the buzz and excitement of a new baby settles, be prepared to feel alone. Everyone goes back to their own lives and suddenly you feel like you’re the only person in the world. Try not to let these feelings become a reality. Get out when you can even if it’s a walk through your neighbourhood.

Every day is different.

You think you have things figured out with your new baby and wham… everything changes because they are growing, changing and developing. It’s a constant guessing game. Be prepared to adapt and don’t be too hard on yourself… you’ll eventually discover what works for your child.

Be prepared to feel grossly incompetent.

This is my most challenging truth. No matter how many books you read, parenting is not easy. At many points in time you will feel incompetent and that’s okay because the honest truth is EVERYONE feels this way at some time or another.

No one is perfect.

As a woman who strives to be the best at whatever tasks I take on, I have learned that no one is perfect, especially when it comes to this “parenting thing”. So take a deep breath and try to see the beauty in imperfection.

The sound of your child’s cry may make you feel insane.

This is okay! We are genetically designed so that our child’s cry will drive us crazy! That’s how babies thrive and survive… if their cries didn’t drive us nuts, we would never be fully meeting their needs because there would be no urgent need to do so!

Do not compare.

Do not compare yourself to other parents and do not compare your child to other children. Each family and person is different. To make matters worse, in the age of chat rooms, blogs, and social media sites, it is really challenging to stand your ground and avoid the comparison “game”. However, make sure to remind yourself that people share and post what they wish to share and post. You are not getting a completely truthful “picture” of what their lives are like! They may post all the great stuff and select not to share their daily struggles and frustrations.

I feel like I could prattle off a hundred more parenting “truths”. However, I would like to encourage you to please share your own parenting truths. Let’s take a few minutes to be honest with the other moms in the world. Let’s take a moment to unite and let each other know that we are not alone.



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Jennifer Bly
Jennifer Bly
Author of My Kitchen, My Classroom: An Introduction to Homeschool and creator of The Deliberate Mom. Jennifer writes about parenting, homeschooling, her faith, and life with her husband and two girls. Jennifer has a Bachelor of Applied Human Service Administration Degree with a specialization in Early Learning in Child Care.



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